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Plantain: One of the Most Common Weeds in the Whole World!

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by Granny Earth, ND

There are 2 species of Plantain: A narrow-leaf called ‘Ribwort Plantain’ and a broad-leaf called ‘Plantain Major’. Plantain is one of the most common ‘weeds’ in the whole, wide world!

The broad-leaf is the one preferred, for making healing remedies and poultices.

Plantain is a perennial ‘weed’ that grows up to 10 inches in height, having a rosette of broad, deeply veined leaves and dense clusters of tiny green flowers (the seeds) on its ‘spikes’. You’re sure to find this ‘weed’ all around your garden and through-out your lawn if you don’t do that totally unthinkable thing and use a ‘weed killer’!

Plantain has a history of being called ‘the healing plant’, because down through the ages, it was used to treat wounds of ALL kinds. After making its way to the ‘New World’, Native Americans called it ‘English-man’s foot’, because it seemed to spring up everywhere, in the foot-steps of those white settlers.

Some of the properties in Plantain are: iridoids, flavonoids, tannins and mucilage. Aucubin (one of the iridoids) will increase excretion of uric acids from the body via the kidneys. So, you might want to try this for arthritic conditions. Andapigenin (a flavonoid) is an excellent anti-inflammatory–also good for arthritis. You can also depend on Plantain to stop blood flow of all wounds and to repair the damaged tissue. It can be used in place of Comfrey for treating bruises and broken bones, too. For these, you would make a poultice with the leaves.

Taken internally (as a tincture) Plantain is diuretic, expectorant, de-congesting. Also used to treat gastritis, peptic ulcers, diarrhea, dysentery, irritable bowel syndrome (I.B.S.), respiratory and urinary tract infections. I still make my Healing Salve, using Plantain- ‘Golden Gincture’ (See end of article.) It’s been known to ‘heal’ many conditions, through out the years, from skin wounds and muscle pain, to hemorrhoids and so much more!

In my opinion, one can never have too much Plantain on hand. He’s easy to pick, abundant and dries well, too. But, the most fun thing I’ve found to do with this weed, is to put him in my ‘weed soup’. Never heard of weed soup? Well, you have now!

First I put a big pot of ‘pure’ water on to boil. While this is getting hot, I chop up some onions, celery, garlic, parsley (or cilantro), celery seed and Himalayan Crystal Salt (for added minerals and taste) and add it all to the water. I wait till the pot’s boiling and turn it down to a simmer. Then I go outside and scout the yard for nice small, young Plantain plants. I dig them up carefully with my dandelion digger and wash them off. The roots are especially important for this adventure. I ever so gently and with great reverence, add the little plants (whole, not chopped) to the pot of simmering soup and let it simmer another ½ hour, or so. Friends are always impressed when I serve them my ‘weed soup.’ A real treat and so easy to make!Plantain, in all his beauty, looks like an exotic Chinese herb. (Page 119–120: Do It Yourself Weed Medicine.)

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1 Comment

  1. Granny Earth says:

    Looks good- thanks! http://www.grannyearth.com

    _____

    From: WELCOME TO OUR ONLINE ARTICLE ARCHIVE [mailto:comment-reply@wordpress.com] Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2014 7:27 AM To: grannyearth@zoominternet.net Subject: [New post] Plantain: One of the Most Common Weeds in the Whole World!

    megan1903 posted: “by Granny Earth, ND There are 2 species of Plantain: A narrow-leaf called Ribwort Plantain and a broad-leaf called Plantain Major. Plantain is one of the most common weeds in the whole, wide world! The broad-leaf is the one preferred, for maki”

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